Category: Animals

#WildernessRevival Thank you so much

Well we have reached the end of March and our campaign for the month #WildernessRevival. We have seen so much wonderful content going up on social media over the past month it has been marvellous.

While March has now ended we encourage you to continue to explore the outdoors and wilderness around you and to continue to appreciate nature the way our ancestors used to.

Please stick around because we have more awesome monthly themes coming up, one for every month and as always thank you so much for your support of WWAP Ministries.

#WildernessRevival; the domesticated dog is a huge part of white culture

#WildernessRevival; appreciate nature they way your ancestors used to. .

Today we are talking about our animal companions, dogs! They encourage us to stay connected to our wild, outdoors-loving, selves! Did you know that Europeans were the first to domesticate dogs?

“Man’s best friend gained that title in Europe, according to a new study that pinpoints the origin of dog domestication to between 18,800 and 32,100 years ago.

The study places the origin of dogs before the rise of agriculture, suggesting that human hunter-gatherers tamed the wolf. Whereas previous genetic studies had placed the origin of dogs in the Middle East or Asia, this research is the first to focus on the genetics of ancient dogs, rather than looking at modern dogs and trying to extrapolate back.

“All modern dogs analyzed in our study were closely related to either ancient dogs and wolves from Europe or modern wolves from there,” study scientist Olaf Thalmann, a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Turku in Finland, told LiveScience…”


#TradLife #Dogs #Europe #WhiteCulture #SaveEurope #thursdaymotivation
#Thursday

Being Shepherds to the People and Companions in Our Lives

The author’s dog, Amy.

Today we have another great post from @atraditionalguy on Twitter.

Just over two years ago an event occurred in our lives which would serve to remind me of the importance of individual people in all that we do.

At the beginning of March 2016 my wife was involved in a small traffic accident thankfully no one was injured in the incident and the damage to the cars was not that great. However my wife had our dog in the car and during the aftermath of the accident the dog Amy ran from the car and disappeared in the surrounding area. I very soon afterwards get a call while I was at work informing me as to what happened, I then leave work and head to the area where Amy had run of into. My wife decided to return home to help spread the word about what happened to see if anyone had seen her while I and a friend of mine began walking the streets looking for her.

To give you some understanding Amy is a rather small dog who is rather scared of most things she does not know so for her to be loose on the streets like this must have been terrifying for her.

I then spent the next two and a half hours walking around the streets looking for her with no luck at all. I checked in bushland, storm water pipes and in any places I came across but I did not find her. I did occasionally bump into people in the area and I asked them if they had seen her but no one had. I then was walking along a road which ran along side the railway line and I came to a point of decision. Do I continue to walk on this side of the railway line or cross over and walk up the other side?

I decided to change side and walk up the other side. As I continued to walk along the road looking for Amy I noticed a couple of cars pulling up on the other side of the road and people getting out. Curious I crossed the road and asked a guy who got out of one of the cars what was happening, he replied “We are trying to catch a small dog”. My heart jumped, now bearing in mind I had no idea if it was indeed my dog but I started walking along the other side of the road in the direction the cars had been travelling. When suddenly out jumps a small black and white dog. I instantly recognise the dog as my little Amy and I gave chase.

During the course of the chase the dog crossed the railway line and a major 4 lane highway during peak hour traffic all the while as you can imagine a small dog is much faster than a mildly unfit 30 something year old guy. As the chase continued we entered a car park and I lost sight of the dog for a short time. As a ran past a near by alleyway I thought if she has gone down there I’ve lost her so I continued to run forward in the hope she had not and soon found myself at a dead end.

As I arrived at the dead end I looked around and there hiding in a corner curled up was Amy. I very gently walked over to her, reassuring her that it was me, I got hold of her and picked her up. I had caught my dog nearly 3 hours after she went missing.

As the days passed and I reflected on what had happened I recognised that it was a direction of the Holy Ghost that I changed to the other side of the train line which led me to finding the dog. As I thought about it further I reminded of the Parable of the Lost Sheep which can be found in The Gospels of Matthew and Luke in The Bible.

In The Parable Jesus talks about a shepherd who leaves his flock and goes looking for a single sheep which is lost and that I was the shepherd and Amy was my lost sheep.

The experience reminded me that with the work we do for our people, our families and our faith – we should never lose focus on the individual people around us because not only are they the ones who need us the most but loving and guiding each other, seeking after our own lost sheep, is the most effective means we all have to spread the truth.

Have you had an experience with an animal companion that has led you to a greater understanding of faith, folk and life? Please share it with us using the Hastag #WildernessRevival. Appreciate nature (and the animals in it) they way your ancestors used to.